Monday, May 27, 2013

Rotary Cutting and Potato Salad

I made potato salad yesterday. Some of you might have also.  This is the recipe I have used for the last couple years and we like it a lot.

I was once told by an elderly German woman that the secret to good potato salad is that you add your vinegar to the potatoes when they are still hot. The Martha Stewart's recipe that I used suggests this also.  That is one reason why I didn't make it very often - that part is a chore.  If you have ever wondered where the phrase "hot potato" came from - I'm sure it is somehow related to making potato salad.  There were juggled and dropped potatoes in my past.  Kitchen towels were used, as were paper towels.  I don't recommend those.  Messy.

Imagine my delight when I discovered a new way to make potato salad.  AND it's a quilting tool that came to the rescue!  I used these......
Yes, rotary cutting gloves.  I bought these (I have 2) a few years ago when I was demonstrating rotary cutting to a group of people - that included children.  I wanted to be a responsible adult and use the gloves that prevented you from cutting yourself.  After that demo I tried to use the gloves in my own quilt making.  I found them cumbersome, and quite frankly, just another thing to clutter up the cutting table.  I know. Bad quilter. I just try to be careful with my cutter and so far - //knocks on wood// - no problem.  The gloves found their way to a box in the quilting room.  A few years ago when I was juggling and dropping potatoes in the sink trying to make potato salad, I remembered them.  I ran them through the washer and dryer and made a batch the next day - BRAVA!  No burnt hands and the little grippy dots on the glove hold the potato like a vise while you  CUT THE POTATOES IN YOUR HAND!  The rotary cutting gloves now get thrown in the wash after each use and now live in the kitchen drawer.  

YOU'RE WELCOME!

My apologies to all you safety minded quilters.

Have you ever used a quilting tool for another use? Have you ever used an unconventional tool in making your quilts?  Can you tell us please?  Just make a comment about it here before Midnight Wednesday May 29th and you could get a copy of our new book - Quilts and Rugs....



I'll be spending the afternoon adding the next border on to my Mrs. Billings quilt.  Pictures soon.

Laurie

54 comments:

Joan and Kevin said...

I use freezer paper for my appliqué quilts.
I know lots of people do this.
Thanks for the giveaway!

Janet said...

I use soap slivers as a marking tool for hand quilting. When they get dull I just wash my hands with them a couple more times to sharpen them up. Not very unconventional but I'm not much of a gadget person. Brilliant use of the cutting gloves!

Sue said...

What a Amazing give away! I would love a chance to win your book :-D

I also use freezer paper for applique. It works great !

Thanks aain !

Julee said...

I used an old rotary cutter & blade to trim edges on wall paper. Thanks for the great giveaway.

WoolenSails said...

I use freezer paper for applique, but I think most people do. My kids always used my scissors for cutting other things and ruined them, lol.

Debbie

Quilting by the Lake said...

I have a great little pair of thread snips, however, there was no cover so the sharp points were always a threat when I was not using the snips. I set out one day to find a cover and I was successful!!!! I use a travel toothbrush. The cover for the brush holds the snip points securely and I have a mini brush to chase the dust bunnies from my machine.

Deb said...

I end up using my rulers not for their intended use. Some rulers just have markings that I like better. I also use freezer paper for my applique pieces (I'm working on your Trick or Treat basket quilt now in reds) and I also use tracing paper for my foundation piecing. It's so much easier to see the lines through both sides of the tracing paper.

beth said...

I use an old toothbrush to dust out my machine bobbin area frequently and use bamboo skewers to push out corners and to draw/press quilting lines right before stitching. The impression of the line is just what I need sometimes. ;)

Logan O'Bier said...

I sliced the side of my finger a couple of months ago! Its quite the story;) I use bowls constantly to sort projects and hold scraps. Teacups for strings and trimmings:)

Anonymous said...

I use mason jars in my sewing room, every size holds something, and I love the look. I use my rotary cutter for everything, even wrapping paper. I was just driving home from Michigan and made an expensive stop at Lake St Mercantile! Lots of Minick and Simpson there! I would love to win the book, thank you for the chance.
Beth F

scottylover said...

I've used plates and cups to mark circles on my fabrics. I also use a treat bowl with three bowls together to store the threads I am using on a project. One of the bowls is the perfect size for my pin cushion to sit in, too.

Sandy A

Alta said...

I use telephone book paper for foundation piecing. It tears away easily since it is thin.

kristie said...

Mascara wands are great for getting lint out from your sewing machine...they are of course ones that are not attached to "mascara". You can buy them very cheap by themselves.

Anonymous said...

My husband took my Japanese scissors and used them to cut meat. Obviously, I don't use them any longer. Sigh.


Becky in Michigan

Nancy in MT said...

Hope you are having a nice Memorial Day and potato salad back home was always the Southern cold spicy mustard variety, miss it.

I use an old rotary cutter and blade to trim my photos for framing.

Love what I have seen of your new book.

Nancy in MT

Karen in Breezy Point said...

I use Julia Child's potato salad recipe that also calls for vinegar (and chicken broth) to be added to the hot potatoes--I'll be trying out the quilting glove tip for sure!
I use bamboo skewers for all sorts of things--mostly to feed fabric through the machine. I also use a coffee mug to hold slippery threads that get threaded up to the thread stand. I occasionally use Press and Seal wrap to hold block pieces while transporting to quilt camp and I've used rubber cement on the back of rulers in a pinch to prevent slipping.

Heather said...

I use big glass jars with glass lids(the kind for storing pasta etc) to store fabric strips of varying widths, and leftover binding pieces - a lot fits in them, and they are very decorative

Carol said...

I also use freezer paper for applique. Couldn't get along without it! I use the plastic containers that bakery items and produce come in for storing fabric fat quarters, charm packs, scraps, etc. They stack well and I can see what is there.
Would love the book! You will be drawing on my birthday so it would be a great birthday if I won!

Debra said...

I use bamboo toothpicks to help turn tight curves and points while doing turn-needle applique.

I also used to use the sample dental floss containers (the cutter part) to cut thread when we couldn't bring scissors on an airplane. - Thankfully now we can!

Would love to be gifted your new book!

Mary on Lake Pulaski said...

I thought you were going to say you cut the potatoes with your rotary cutter. My metal carpenters tape measure from my tool box works better for measuring a quilt back than a flimsy one!

jabeybaby said...

I use plastic 12"x12" scrapbook paper containers to hold my finished quilt blocks before they are ready to be sewn into a quilt. They are great WIPs. :-)

Mary said...

I use cotton swabs to clean up my sewing machine. They get in little spots great. Thanks for the chance to win the new book. It looks awesome.

Mary

Kay Harmon said...

I use drafting circle templates to ensure my wool applique circles are perfectly round.
I also use an empty medicine bottle to deposit my used sewing machine needles in.
I use shelf liner rubbery stuff (don't know what it's called) to sit my sewing machine on so it won't move.
Cotton Quilt batting is a perfect replacement for dry Swiffer cloths. The cotton traps dust better than the "real" cloths - and costs only pennies. Batting also makes a good dust cloth.

woolwoman said...

I'm not a quilter but a hooker however I'd love a chance to win that book ! thanks Melody

Anonymous said...

yes, love that new book......I actually use the wooden sticks with a point on them - for a stiletto while sewing......

Thanks from South Carolina, gloria g.

Mary said...

I use cannisters to hold selvedges and trims. I also use the 2.5 gal zip lock bags to keep projects together. And no more fabric crises because I used fabric set aside for a different project

Anonymous said...

yes skewers....that's the word I was looking for above....

press n seal for drawing out quilting designs and sewing through.....

coffee mugs for holding lots of things......

anyway, just some thoughts,

again, thank you, gloria g. South Carolina

Anonymous said...

I use "clic clac" hairclips instead of the expensive wonderclips while handsewing the binding to my quilts.

Hanske, The Netherlands

Laurie in Iowa said...

I use an emery board to mark the diagonal line on a quilt square. It grips the fabric nicely.

AJ GM said...

I broke my long quilt rule, as its perspex, and clear, I cut it into thin, long triangular strips (band saw), put them in the oven to soften the plastic, whilst its soft you can twist the strips (with gloves and tongs!). Once cooled, drill a small thread hole and dad da! Beautiful icicle decorations that hang on my apple tree outside in winter. The sun catching them is fantastic.

~Laurie~ said...

It's been fun to read through these helpful hints! I use my seam ripper to get all the lint out of the inside of my sewing machine :)

Gayle said...

I use bowls and plates from the kitchen all the time to get just the right sized circle for making my penny rugs. Great ideas here!

Ginny Worden said...

I use a grapefruit spoon, the one with the serrated tip to help me pin baste my quilts. I find it is the perfect tool to close the pins, and I get really upset when I can't find it in the sewing room.

KatB said...

I use a phillips head screwdriver to help close safety pins when pin basting.

Lisa said...

I trace cookie cutters for applique and quilting motifs. I also use coloring books to get basic applique shapes. Love your patterns!

liberty star quilts said...

Yes, I too use freezer paper for applique...not too original! Can't wait to see your new book! Would be so excited to win it! Love all of your fabric and designs! Thanks for all of the inspiration!

Anne said...

I use pipe cleaners to clean the bobbin area. Also, I use my large rotary cutter to cut poster board when framing something. Your new book looks fabulous!

jackiero said...

My hubby likes to make his own paper pots to start his vegetable seeds in. Now this is where my quilting tools come into the scene. I use my long ruler & a rotery cutter (I keep one just for cutting paper) to cut his strips, which he shapes into paper pots. He likes how they eventually disappear into the soil and zero cost.
Jackie in NC

Deb said...

I used an upside down bowl for a cake dome; I was making a cake and cupcake quilt....and I needed the dome to cover the cupcakes. Turned out great.

Mary said...

I use clear flexible medical tape on the bottom of rulers to keep them from slipping around, Q-tips to clean around my bobbin area, painter's tape to mark for quilting, and plastic pencil boxes for holding small items. And my magnetic pin holder has kept my little granddaughter entertained on several occasions.

Anonymous said...

I use a kitchen mat for glueing my applique edges before I stitch them. Linda C

Twyla's Thimble said...

I use freezer paper to stabilize my quilt labels so I can write on them. Would love your new book!! Thanks for the chance.

llavmc said...

I use the clips to hold down a tablecloth for holding my backing in place while I sandwich and pin baste my quilts. It works great!

Pamela said...

I use a watercolor paint brush to clean the bobbin area of my machine, love the longer handle, it makes it a lot easier! I also use a butter knife with a smooth edge to mark straight lines for quilting.

Laura T said...

I was given new pap smear stick paper that is coated to use for applique from a quilting teacher. You put glue on the end and then lightly put the glue on the turned under edge of the applique piece to keep it in place until you hand stitch it down.
It's a slick idea:)
LauraT

Audrey said...

I used an old rotary cutter, my long ruler and a mat for cutting wallpaper. It worked so well!!

Margaret said...

I use a roll of doctor's office paper, the kind they use on the exanination table, for lots of sewing applications. Most often I make patterns from it and draw out potential quilt ideas on it.

Vicky said...

Before I discovered circle templates, I rummaged through the whole house looking for something round of the size I needed. Finally discovered a bottle of vitamins in the medicine cabinet that had a cap the perfect size!

Martine said...

Freezer paper for appliqué, cups and saucers and bowls to trace quiltpatterns with a rest of soap, an antique glass bowl with holes to hold flowers to put my scissors on my table (pique fleursin french)

American Homestead said...

I use an old rotary cutter and old blades to cut wrapping paper at
Christmas time. My cutting table is a nice big work surface.

Nyla said...

I use the cardboard trays under bottled water as project trays. They work great for an appliqué block with needles, thread, pins and small scissors. I also use them to house small projects like a mini quilt as I work on it. They are portable, I love taking them in the car. Would love to win a copy of your new book, it looks great!

Jean C. said...

To be completely honest; this idea came from Bonnie Hunter's blog. She uses an old dental floss box (the ones with a cutter attached) to take with her on the plane so she doesn't have to have scissors while doing hang work in the air! But; one item I used is a tracing wheel... ahem, I use it sometimes for cutting ravioli noodles! Or to cut out cookies if I just want simple squares.

DebrafromMD said...

I use cuticle sticks to guide my fabrics while piecing and round toothpicks to help turn edges when I appliqué.

Anonymous said...

Seeing that I don't quilt or sew at all - I still enjoy the finished products - and you and polly's blog so writing to thank you for that and to enter my name for the contest - would love this book on my coffee table - Deb Himes

Blog Archive